Hiram Obed Rose (1830-1911)

From Biographical Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Captain Hiram Obed Rose
Captain H. O. Rose
Born: 27 Nov 1830 Cambria, New York
Died: 7 Jan 1911 Petoskey, Michigan
Siblings: Hiram Obed Rose
Spouse: (1) Nancy Shears
Married: abt 1853
Children: Robert Henry Rose
Spouse: (2) Juliet Burbeck
Married: 15 Sep 1856 Northport, Michigan
Children: Elizabeth A. Rose
Abigail Rose

Powers, Perry Francis. A History of Northern Michigan and Its People, pp 1121-1123:

HIRAM O. ROSE.- "A truly great life," says Webster, "when Heaven vouchsafes so rare a gift, is not a temporary flame, burning bright for a while and then expiring, giving place to returning darkness. It is rather a spark of fervent heat as well as radiant light, with power to enkindle the common mass of human mind; so that when it glimmers in its own decay, and finally goes out in death, no night follows, but it leaves the world all light, all on fire, from the potent contact of its own spirit."

Captain Hiram O. Rose, one of the prominent business men and influential citizens of Petoskey, Michigan, at the time of his demise, on the 7th of January, 1911, was long one of the most honored residents of northern Michigan.

A native of the fine old Empire state of the Union, Capt. Hiram O. Rose was born in Cambria, New York, the date of his nativity being the 27th of November, 1830. He was a son of Stephen and Mary Rose, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New York. In the public schools of his native place Captain Rose received his preliminary educational training.

When three years old he came to Michigan, locating at Bronson, Michigan, where he set about working diligently for a better education. For a time he worked in a grocery store, studying hard during the winter school term, and eventually he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade. His first work along that line of endeavor was in the printing office of the Coldwater Sentinel, where he was employed for three years, the first year receiving thirty dollars in wages, the second forty dollars, and the third year sixty dollars, in addition to which he also received his board and clothes and the privilege of three months' schooling each year. After he had thoroughly familiarized himself with the ins and outs of the printer's trade he was foreman in the office of the Coldwater Sentinel for one year, at the munificent salary of ten dollars per month.

In 1849 he decided to try his fortunes in the far west and in that year went to California, via the Panama route. He remained in the Golden state for two years, at the expiration of which he returned to Michigan.

In 1853, learning of the wonderful copper mines of the upper peninsula, he immediately proceeded to that section of the state. En route, he was stormbound on South Manitou Island for ten days, during which time he learned to measure and sell wood. Later, the small schooner, upon which he left the island, touching at Frankfort and Northport, the fine forests and beauty of the surrounding country caused him to enter a tract of government land. Subsequently, going to the land office at Mackinaw, he purchased a tract of eight hundred acres, on which he started a store and boarding house, developing the timber resources of his land very rapidly.

In some of his enterprises in the upper peninsula he was associated with Amos Fox, the former companion of his western experiences. For a period of nineteen years Captain Rose remained at Northport, while Mr. Fox handled the business of the firm of Rose & Fox at Charlevoix. When this firm began its fur-trading the Captain made the trip from Northport to Bear Creek, now Petoskey, and Harbor Springs, every February, following along the trail left by Father Marquette and staying with Andrew Porter at the Presbyterian Mission school during his trips.

"It was during these early years that the title Captain was given Hiram 0. Rose by his warm friend, J. M. Katheaney, father of Mrs. Quaintance, and by this title of love and esteem he has always been known.

Dr. Little was also one of those early friends and when he built the first hotel here he and his good wife (Mrs. Kirkland) called it the Rose House. Captain Rose and his party spent those first weeks at the home of Chief Petoskey, whose constant friend the Captain always remained."

Captain Rose was the first president of the village and it was during his incumbency that the present water works system of Petoskey was planned, although the work thereof was carried to completion by Colonel Toll later. The Captain erected the first electric lighting plant at Petoskey and in due time he disposed of it to the city. He was instrumental in organizing the first lime company, building the opera house and the Arlington hotel, in which important concerns he retained an interest up to just a few years prior to his demise. He also succeeded in getting the first ferry line to ply between Petoskey and Harbor Springs and also between this port and Charlevoix. He was unusually active in obtaining many important improvements for this part of the state and whenever any matter affecting the general welfare was at stake the Captain was called upon to push the good work along.

While Captain Rose lived to reach the venerable age of four-score years, he was active and alert to the last, retaining in much of their pristine vigor the splendid mental and physical qualities of his youth. His fine health and great strength can be attributed largely to his out-of-door life.

In polities he accorded a stanch allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor and while he never participated actively in politics, other than in local affairs, he was ever ready to give of his aid and influence in support of all matters projected for the good of the general welfare. He was affiliated with a number of representative fraternal and social organizations of a local nature and in all the avenues of life he so conducted himself as to command the unqualified confidence and esteem of all with whom he came in contact. He was a man of wide experience and broad information, was possessed of a deep human sympathy and great kindliness of spirit, and his friends were legion, bound in no sense by party lines or religious creeds. A man of splendid executive ability, he succeeded in gaining a high place for himself in the business world of Petoskey and the country normally tributary thereto. He himself built the ladder by which he rose to affluence and inasmuch as his admirable success in life was the outcome of his own well directed endeavors it is the more gratifying to contemplate.

At Northport, Michigan, in the year 1854, Captain Rose was united in marriage to Miss Juliet Burbeck, whose birth occurred in Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of James and Abbie (Spencer) Burbeck. This union was prolific of two children,-daughters, Libbie, who became the wife of E. A. Foster and who now maintains her home in California; and Abby, who wedded George Bathrick, of Iowa. Mrs. Bathrick was the constant companion of her parents during their declining years and she now remains with her widowed mother at the old Rose home in Petoskey. Captain Rose is also survived by a grandson, Ralph Bell, and by two nephews, E. L. and Ed Rose.

When Captain Rose celebrated his eightieth birthday, on Sunday, November 27, 1910, he and his wife attended church and after the service was over they had a few of their closest friends at their home for dinner. On the following Wednesday Hon. and Mrs. Curtis entertained a number of people at dinner in honor of the Captain. In his religious faith Captain Rose was an attendant of the Episcopal church. His funeral was conducted under the auspices of the Knights Templar of the Masonic order, of which Captain Rose was long a valued and appreciative member, and his remains were interred in Greenwood Cemetery. Concerning the high place in which Captain Rose was held in his home community, the following statements are here incorporated, the same being taken from an article which appeared in a local paper just after his demise.


Greenwood Cemetery:

H.O. Rose (1830-1911)

Hiram Obed Rose left upstate New York with his family to come to Coldwater, Michigan at the age of four. He left the printing business in Coldwater to try his hand at gold mining during the California Gold Rush. He eventually returned to Michigan settling near Traverse City to enter into business there. In 1875 he started into business in Petoskey by purchasing a sawmill. Over the years he mined limestone for the production of cement and owned a merchandise store. He built one of Petoskey’s famous hotels, the Arlington House and was its first village president, presiding over the building of a water works and an electrical plant. In 1882 he and another man built the Opera House which claimed Mark Twain as its most famous entertainer.

It is said that we stand on the shoulders of those that have gone before us. If that is true it certainly can be said that every resident of Petoskey stands squarely on the shoulders of Hiram Obed Rose. It is hard to imagine a Petoskey without him.


Obituary

The Petoskey Record, Wednesday, January 11, 1911:

Death Clains Last of Pioneer
Band in Capt. Hiram O. Rose

Again we are called upon to record the death of a man whose life has been closely interwoven with the history of Petoskey--Capt. Hiram O. Rose. He was the last of the band of men who came into this northern country at an age when the boys of today are thinking only of fun and games, but the early fifties were the days of rapid strenuous living for the youth who were to make the wilderness into the homes of the land.

Capt. Rose worked diligently for an education, working in a grocery store and studying had the winter he was 15 years old, and later becoming apprentice in the printing office of the Coldwater Sentinel, where he worked for three years, the first year receiving $80 in wages, the second $40, and the third year $60, besides his board and the privilege of three months’ schooling each year. Later Captain Rose was foreman of the office for one year at the magnificent salary of $10 per month. After that he went west, going by way of Panama to California, where he stayed two years.

It was in 1858 that, learning of the wonderful copper mines of the upper peninsula, he decided to again leave his home in the south part of Michigan and journey northward. Being stormbound on South Manton Island for ten days, he spent the time in learning to measure and sell wood, and later the small schooner, upon which he left the island, touching at Frankfort and Northport the fine forests and beauty of the land, decided the Captain to take up some land. He went to the land office at Mackinaw and purchased 800 acres, returning to start a store and boarding house, developing the resources of his timber land rapidly. Later the companion of his western experiences, Amos Fox, joined him and they were associated for many years. For nineteen years Captain Rose stayed at Northport and Mr. Fox in the meantime came to Charlevoix for the firm. When they began their fur trading the Captain made the trip from Northport to Bear Creak (Petoskey) and Harbor Springs every February along the trail left by Father Marquette, staying with Andrew Porter at the Presbyterian mission school on these trips.

It was during these early years that the title “Captain” was given Mr. Rose by his warm friend, J. M. Metheaney, father of Mrs. Quaintance, and by this title of love and esteem he has always been known. Dr. Little was also one of those early friends and when he built the first hotel here he and his good wife (Mrs. Kirkland) called it the Rose House. Captain Rose and his party spent those first weeks at the home of Chief Petoskey, whose constant friend the Captain always remained.

Without doubt this outdoor life is accountable for the strength which carried Captain Rose through his 80 years in the condition of body and mind which he showed up until his last illness, only a few short weeks ago. The writer talking to the Captain recently was struck by the remarkable strength, brightness and happiness of his mental condition, while the brave fight he made for his life during his last illenss showed that the body was still vigorous.

Captain Rose was the first president of the village and during these first two years the present water works system was planned, although the work was carried to completion by Col. Toll later. The first electric light plant was put in by Captain Rose, who later sold to the city. He was instrumental in organizing the first lime company, building the opera house and the Arlington hotel, his interest in which he sold out only a few years ago. He also succeeded in getting the first ferry line to ply between Petoskey and Harbor Springs and also between this port and Charlevoix. In those days whenever anything was to be done Captain Rose was interested and helpful in pushing the work along.

Hiram O. Rose was born in Cambria, N.Y., November 27th, 1830, and was married to Miss Juliet Burbeck at Northport in 1854. Two daughters were born, Mrs. E. A. Foster, who has lived for a year or so in California, and Mrs. Abby Rose Bathrick, who has been the constant companion of her parents since they became more frail with the passing years. There is also one grandson, Ralph Bell, whose childish pranks were a constant delight to his grandfather when they lived within a few doors of each other. Two nephews, E. L. and Ed. Rose also survive, while a host of those to whom the Captain has been a friend in sorrow or in joy mourn for him. When the Captain celebrated his 80th birthday, Sunday, November 27th, he and his wife attended church and afterward had a few near friends at their home for dinner, while the next Wednesday Hon. and Mrs. Curtis entertained a small company at dinner in honor of Captain Rose.

The remains lay in state at Emmanuel Episcopal Church from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. yesterday, when the funeral service of the church was read by the rector, Rev. Charles F. Westman. The Knights Templar escorted the remains to the church and attended the service at the cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Cushman met Mrs. Foster in Grand Rapids and accompanied her home. One specially sad circumstance is the fact of the very serious condition Mrs. Rose is in, being near death’s door herself. Mrs. Bathrick has given the tenderest and most loving care to her parents for many years, has tended to every wish of theirs and been their faithful watcher throughout this sad time.

S. H. Peck, of New Arlington, associated with Captain Rose for years without, as he says, the very smallest disagreement, is among those who are here to give honor to his dear friend. Captain Rose gave the right of way for the railroad between this city and Bay View and did all in his power to assist in getting it through, and the following officials arrived on a special train yesterday morning to show their esteem and respect for the departed: W. B. Stimson, assistant general manager; C. L. Lockwood, general passenger agent; R. R. Metheany, secretary and auditor; and B. C. Levenworth, general freight agent.

While the honor shown by those in high places is a matter to stir the pride of friends, we believe that the very sincere and heartfelt sorrow of rich and poor, old and young, would be the dearest to Captain Rose who loved his friends in all stations of life with unusual warmth. The truest sympathy is extended to Mrs. Foster to whom the trip is such a sad one and to Mrs. Bathrick, who has borne the long time watching and waiting and anxiety.

--Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Struble came up from Grand Rapids to attend the funeral of Captain H. O. Rose.

--S. H. Peck, of Grand Rapids, was in the city yesterday to attend the funeral of his old friend and business associate, Capt. H. O. Rose. He will remain for several days.

Sources

  • Death: State of Michigan, Certificate of Death:
Name: Hiram O Rose
Place of Death: Petoskey, Emmet, Michigan
Gender: Male
Color: W.
Marital Status: Married
Date of Birth: Nov 27, 1830
Age: 80 years 1 months 11 days
Occupation: Retired
Birthplace of Decedent: New York
Father: Cyrenus Rose
Father’s birth place: New York
Mother: Unknown
Mother’s birth place: N.Y.
Informant: Amos L. Henika, Petoskey Mich
Burial date and place: Greenwood Cem, Jan 10, 1911
Undertaker: C. B. Henika & Co, Petoskey
Date filed: Jan 10, 1911
Registrar: L. D. Ely
Date of death: Jan 7, 1911
Date last see alive: Jan 7th, 1911
Date attended deceased: Dec 29th, 1910 to Jan. 7th, 1911
Time death occurred: 5 p.m.
Cause of death: La Grippe and Pneumonia
Contributory: old age
Name and address of Physician: George E. Reycraft, MD, Jan 10, 1911, Petoskey, Mich
  • Death: Michigan Deaths and Burials, 1800-1995:
Name: Name: Hiram O. Rose
Gender: Male
Death Date: 07 Jan 1911
Death Place: Petoskey, Emmet Co., Michigan
Age: 80
Birth Date: 1831
Birthplace: N.Y.
Occupation: Retired
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Father's Name: Cyrenus Rose
Mother's Name: Unknown
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: B51847-9
System Origin: Michigan-EASy
Source Film Number: 966504
Reference Number: cn 210
Rose, Hiram Obed
Age: 80
Born: 11/27/1830
Died: 1/7/1911
Burial: 1/10/1911
Cemetery: Greenwood, Petoskey
Obituary: on file, PR 01/11/1911
Section: D
Block: 26
Lot: 1
  • Petoskey Evening News, Monday, September 9, 1918, Obituary: Krusell, Joseph